Within a video project I was focusing on recently, I got the opportunity to get my practical a fresh cooler in the YETI line: the Tundra 65.

I’d been hearing about YETI coolers for a long time and was always curious in regards to what the big deal was with them. In the end, isn’t a cooler simply a plastic box you retain your beer in? That which was so different in regards to a YETI when compared to cheap version I possibly could buy at the neighborhood drug store or gas station? Obviously, I had my reservations about the YETI line. Not because I hadn’t heard good stuff, but because I couldn’t imagine them being any unique of the a large number of coolers already available to buy.

Here’s what I came across. The Tundra 65 is crazy durable. YETI boasts that the cooler is certified bear resistant-a declare that I wouldn’t question after inspecting its construction. It includes a storage area with the capacity of holding 39 cans of beer and the ice essential to keep it cool (or 57.6 liters of space for storage).

Initially, the Tundra looks nearly the same as other coolers. However, it can employ a nice latching system with two rubber, tensioning clips to secure the lid, along with some incredibly durable handles for hauling. Additionally, normally it takes padlocks should you have to ship your cooler or if you’re really protective of your meal in camp.

While testing the Tundra, I came across it held ice for an unbelievable amount of time. Looking into it the morning after an outing, it appeared that the vast majority of the ice was still intact and incredibly little had melted. So, I gave it a later date, and 36 hours after in the beginning filling it, there is still ice found. (I stopped checking from then on, so I can’t let you know how much longer it might have lasted). Additionally, the Tundra is borderline over-engineered. I’ve coolers from other trips that are cracked and dented. I can’t imagine doing a lot more than investing in a few scratches to the Tundra. Its plastic is incredibly thick and doesn’t feel practically as “hollow” because so many other competing brands.

There are several downsides to the Tundra, though. To be able to provide this amazing amount of insulation, you do sacrifice interior storage. But that’s simply a balance you’ll need to determine: how much you intend to carry versus how cold you will need what to stay. Additionally, the Tundra is heavy! It’s not really a cooler you wish to need to carry for quite a distance, unless you’re buying a new fitness routine-in which case, this could possibly be perfect. But if you’re car camping or on a boat, the weight is not actually a lot of a problem.

In general, I was very impressed with the YETI Tundra 65. Its strength and refrigeration are first rate. In addition, YETI has spent lots of time making all its coolers smartly designed and pretty cool looking.