We have followed the overall game Drive lineup during the last couple of years, from initial HDD offerings in Xbox and PS4 flavors to SSD models for increased loading performance.

THE OVERALL GAME Drive for PS4 enters its second iteration with an increase of capacity options over the original 1TB offering. These new solutions can be found in a 2 and 4TB capacity, with separate colorways and a standard enclosure size setting them apart. The 2TB model is a black on black enclosure, 12.1mm z-height with capacity of 50+ games. The 4TB model is a blue on black enclosure and is slightly thicker at 20.7mm, with 100+ game capacity. Each one of these models hook up over USB 3.0 and so are PlayStation approved solutions.

MSRP of the 2TB Game Drive for PS4 will come in at $109.99 with a three-year warranty. The 4TB Game Drive for PS4 reaches $149.99 with a one-year warranty.

Packaging is fairly vibrant, capacity listed prominently at 2TB with a graphic of the drive to the proper.

On the back, we’ve mention of guarantee at the very top and features in the bottom.

Contained in the box may be the micro B to A cable and user manual.

The drive itself works on the typical lightweight drive form factor that people have observed in the Expansion and Backup Plus lineups from Seagate. We’ve PS4 branding at the very top with the experience LED and a subtle Seagate logo bottom right.

As stated, this solution uses USB 3.0 for connectivity, but I was quite surprised to start to see the micro B connector become popular again.

Internally, THE OVERALL GAME Drive PS4 runs on the Mobile HDD from Seagate.

To get a concept of the drive’s performance, I ran through an instant test with Black Magic Design and came away sort of impressed. This drive could reach 135 MB/s read, and 130 MB/s write.

Closing this out, the overall game Drive for PS4 can be an interesting solution. Similarly, we’ve a capacity-driven design which is excellent as gamers certainly prefer to keep games installed all set. Increasing this great colorway is that it matches the console’s connectivity with USB 3.0. On the other, it seems we’ve a vendor in Seagate which has an overstock of old LM007 drives they have to remove. They are determined to use them rather than pushing out the brand new Barracuda models.

Having said that, performance isn’t that bad, I actually managed reached 130 MB/s read and write upon this model which is fairly best for a 5400rpm solution. I don’t believe games do a large amount of sequential read when loading to generate a 7200rpm solution make that a lot of a difference.

With this solution I believe it all boils down to cost, using the drive used in the overall game Drive includes a list price of $70 USD, increase a USB 3.0 enclosure we are near $90. This puts us $19 dollars from the MSRP of the overall game Drive for PS4, that occurs to be Sony approved and can not void your warranty.

Tyler’s Test System Specifications
Motherboard: ASUS Prime Z370 (obtain Amazon)
CPU: Intel Core i3 8350K (obtain Amazon)
RAM: Corsair Vengeance 32GB 4x8GB DDR4 3200 (obtain Amazon)
Cooler: Corsair Hydro H115i (obtain Amazon)
Case: Corsair Air 540 (obtain Amazon)
OS Storage: Samsung 960 EVO 250GB (obtain Amazon)
POWER: Corsair RM850x (obtain Amazon)
OS: Microsoft Windows 10 (obtain Amazon)
Wi-Fi NIC: ASUS PCE-AC88 (obtain Amazon)
10Gbe NIC: ASUS XG-C100C (obtain Amazon)
Thunderbolt 3: ASUS Thunderbolt EX3 (obtain Amazon)