Summary
The COOLPX B700 offers a fairly compelling all-round package. With the combo of the 60x zoom, Raw shooting and 4K movies alongside the seamless connectivity supplied by Snapbridge, there’s hardly any that compares with the B700 as of this price. Ultimately though, it mostly boils down to the 60x zoom range and SnapBridge, that will permit you to share you images with reduced effort. 4K UHD movies and RAW shooting sound impressive, however, many might question the amount of extra quality they’ll provide used given the limitations of the compact sensor. Yet, they’re great benefits to have and so are supported with manual exposure control and plenty of feature modes. There’s a also the wonderful viewfinder and articulated screen to element in, though these remain unchanged from the sooner COOLPIX P610, which might be available at a lesser price.

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In depth
The Nikon COOLPIX B700 can be an SLR-styled super-zoom with a 60x optical contact lens. The lens covers a variety from 24mm to 1440mm in 35mm equivalent conditions and includes a maximum aperture of f3.3 closing to f6.5 at the telephoto end of the zoom.

The B700’s 20 Megapixel sensor supports 4k UHD video and the as PASM exposure modes for stills shooting it includes a raft of scene and show modes. There’s a 3 inch 921k dot vari-angle screen that may face any direction and a 0.2in 921k electronic viewfinder which is specially useful with all the zoom at or near its maximum range.

The B700 may be the latest Nikon compact to take advantage of the company’s new Snapbridge technology. The camera has built-in Wifi, NFC and Bluetooth chips. The low-power Bluetooth connection can be utilised to automatically transfer photographs to your smartphone and also tag photographs in the camera with geolocation data and watermarks. Wifi is employed for more conventional manual selection and wireless transfer of photographs to your phone and the NFC chip provides tap-to-connect for suitably equipped Android phones. All this is handled by the SnapBridge iOS or Android smartphone app.

In the event that you own a COOLPIX P610 all of this is most likely sounding quite familiar. The B700 may be the natural successor to the P610 with which it shares the same 60x zoom, the screen and electronic viewfinder. The COOLPIX B700 was introduced in late 2016 alongside a budget sibling, the COOLPIX B500. The B500 includes a shorter 40x optical zoom range, lacks a viewfinder, does not have any PASM exposure modes, no 4K video and is normally a simpler less superior model compared to the B700. It costs just a little over half what you’ll purchase the B700. So here’s the question: is all that control and sophistication worth the excess money, or will the less costly COOLPIX B500 offer you all you need or want from a super-zoom. In my own review I’ve tested and compared both models, so continue reading to discover which may be the best superzoom for you personally.

Nikon COOLPIX B700 design and controls

Externally, the COOLPIX B700 looks little dissimilar to the Earlier P610 and even the P600 before that, and yes, the even earlier P500. Clearly Nikon thinks it’s got an absolute form factor here and I’m not likely to argue. The COOLPIX B700 fits very comfortably in my own hands. The grip, which is covered in soft textured rubber-like material is slightly shallower than that on the B500 (which has to be bigger to support four AA batteries) but continues to be generous. I’ve got quite long fingers and my middle finger just makes connection with your body when wrapped around the grip.

The dimensions are 125 x 85 x 106mm and the B700 weighs 570g with the battery and a card – that’s just a little bigger at all times and slightly below 30g, or around an ounce heavier compared to the B500. I possibly could comfortably fit the B500 in my own parka pocket; the B700 went in, nonetheless it was a good squeeze and somewhat of a faff to reunite out.

At the top panel, the mode dial has positions for auto mode, the PASM modes, three dedicated scene mode positions (Night landscape, Night portrait and Landscape) a Scene position for the rest of the scene modes (selected via the screen menu) Creative effects and lastly a user defined mode. To the proper of the mode dial you’ll find the on/off button and a programmable function button that used to be labelled Fn, but is currently Fn1. That’s for the reason that dedicated Wifi button on the trunk panel is now another programmable function button labelled Fn2.

On the trunk the control dial is flanked by playback, menu and delete buttons with a movie record button conveniently positioned right above the thumb rest. Here, right above the screen you’ll also discover a button for toggling display overlays along with another button for toggling between your screen and the viewfinder.

The screen is a 3 inch LCD panel with resolution of 921k dots. It’s the same panel as on the B500 plus they both give a bright detailed image that’s viewable from a broad angle. The difference may be the mounting. As the B500 comes with an articulated hinge in the bottom letting you flip it along, the COOLPIX B700’s screen includes a hinge at the medial side with the screen mounted on a rotating pin. This enables you to carefully turn it in virtually any direction – facing forward for selfies, orientated for portrait format shooting, and folded in on itself for protection.