INTRODUCTION

The Nike Pegasus is, by far, the longest continuing running footwear series (excluding retro releases) in the annals of the footwear industry. The ’34’ suffix to the shoe name is a testimony to how long the Pegasus ‘s been around. It won’t be far fetched to state that the Pegasus is practically as old as Nike itself.

Just what exactly makes the Pegasus so special? But that’s asking the incorrect question. The Pegasus isn’t special at all, and that’s perhaps its greatest strength. The Pegasus may be the footwear exact carbon copy of the child nearby – not the smartest or the most athletic, but someone you’re comfortable hanging out with all day.

This decently priced, neutral cushioned trainer by Nike fits that analogy. There’s cushioning, yet it’s not ultra soft. The upper fits well without cocooning your feet in material plushness. The Zoom Air bags give a snappy feel beneath the forefoot and rear, and the outsole is really as durable because they come. Quite simply, the Pegasus 34’s insufficient special is why is it endearing to so many.

The same can’t be said for the Structure, the Nike Pegasus’s stability counterpart. The Nike Structure has truly gone through many changes with all the current enthusiasm of a swinging pendulum. Some versions worked well, while some were flawed. But, that’s a tale for another time. So for the present time, we’ll stick to topic.

If you’re a long-time Nike user, you then would be acquainted with Nike’s biennial design update cadence. For some Nike jogging shoes, midsole and outsole changes happen once in 2 yrs as the upper changes annually. The Pegasus 33 updated the midsole and outsole, which means this year it’s time for an upper-only refresh.

Very little has changed because the Pegasus 33. The midsole and outsole stay the same, and all updates happen on the Pegasus 34’s new upper. The upper changes aren’t major and just are actually tiny tweaks designed to the material and construction. The important update may be the Pegasus 34’s upper fit – it really is narrower compared to the 33 because of the revised positioning of the Flywire cords.

So if you’re not in a mood to pay new-shoe dollars for the Pegasus 34, it’s correctly ok to remain with the 33 for another year. In this manner, you can save a lot of money by obtaining the outgoing Pegasus 33. That might be a financially prudent decision, as the dissimilarities between your 33 and 34 usually do not amount to much.

DESIGN AND MATERIALS

As the Pegasus 34’s upper bears a close resemblance to the prior designs, efforts have already been designed to align the aesthetic scheme with Nike’s ‘Breaking 2’ collection. The Pegasus 34 is inspired by the clean lines of the Vaporfly 4% and the Zoom Fly. This inspiration also reaches the large vents on the Pegasus 34’s engineered mesh upper and the ‘speed lines’ running over the medial side.

The Flywire cords are actually concealed by the first layer of the engineered mesh, that is a contrast to the exposed design of the Pegasus 33’s Flywire cords. Hiding the Flywire now allows the 34 to go the Swoosh logo to a far more prominent location over the guts.

The essential upper construction is comparable to the previous few Pegasus versions. An individual little bit of mesh wraps around the entirety of the shoe, with another internal layer forming the half-sleeve mounted on the tongue. In the trunk, there’s a difficult internal counter and the toe area includes a pliable stiffener.

No change could be observed on the tongue and collar lining. The tongue is sparsely padded as always, and the collar runs on the soft textile with a foam fill inside. The last two lacing rows are non-Flywire, and the reserve row can be utilised for heel-lock lacing when asked.

What’s new on the Pegasus 34’s upper may be the engineered mesh with larger-than-before vents. When compared to past few models, the forefoot has bigger pores which allow improved splay and ventilation. Even though it really is difficult to see from the exterior, the internal toe-bumper seems to have gained height too.

Also new will be the flat laces and the external heel design. The Pegasus finally switches to flat laces with one minute amount of stretch in them, that is a much-needed improvement over the round laces of days gone by models.

We say this for the reason that flat laces do an improved job of distributing top-down pressure and stay tied-down longer too.

The counter gets additional urethane reinforcement over the sides and back. The sides are actually covered in a transparent laminate (identical to what’s applied to the lacing area), and the heel center includes a thicker urethane with reflective strips over it.

That is one area where in fact the Pegasus 34 is shortchanged; the amount of reflectivity is leaner than the 33.

True to its once-in-two-years midsole design update cycle, the Pegasus 34 carries forward the same sole design from the 33 (which had a whole new sole unit). The Pegasus 33 introduced yet another Zoom Air bag beneath the forefoot this past year, and that is still the case for the 34 too.

Nike’s EVA foam – Cushlon – forms the majority of the 10 mm drop, single-density foam midsole, with Zoom Air bags embedded in individual heel and forefoot cavities. Unlike shoes including the Vomero, the EVA used isn’t very soft and is tinged with firmness.

Outsole coverage is plentiful. Aside from some of exposed midsole foam beneath the heel, underneath is generously overlaid with durable and grippy rubber. The outer side includes a group of ‘crash rail’ – pairs of rubber strips – for smoother transitions.

Not absolutely all hard Carbon rubber types will be the same; the compound found in some brands go longer compared to the others. Nike’s formulation because of its outsole rubber hits the sweet spot between delivering traction and durability. We’ve rarely run into complaints about the Pegasus’s sole, and that’s because they often last very long.

You should be in a position to extract a lot more than 400 miles with the Pegasus. Deterioration may happen with the foam midsole and insole, although Zoom Air bags will retain their cushioning given that they don’t accidentally deflate.

The double-layered upper is durable as ever, so it’s unlikely that it’ll fail prior to the midsole.

UPPER FIT AND FEEL

The Pegasus switched to a slim fit following the version 30, and the 34 is comparable in lots of ways to the 31, 32, and 33. Having said that, there are some welcome updates to the fit. As stated previously, the flat laces execute a much better job of sitting flush over the thinly padded tongue.

The brand new mesh material has larger vents, so there’s somewhat of extra splay room on the sides. Not saying that the Pegasus 33 was narrow, however the 34 just relaxes the sideways fit extremely slightly. As a bonus, the Pegasus 34 is more breathable compared to the 33.

We’re able to be wrong, however the toe-box height also feels higher. It really is our guess that the inner toe-stiffener is raised over the 33, freeing up somewhat of vertical room. In the trunk, the heel fits and feels the same, with the entire heel-to-toe sizing being true.

Moving almost all of the Flywire between your upper layers also ensures that the cords are nearer to the foot. This change is something you can sense, as the thin cords strain against the foot when laced tight.

The heel offers a secure grip. The inner heel counter provides the mandatory support, and the padded collar wraps the foot without slippage.

RIDE QUALITY AND BEHAVIOR

If you’re expecting the Pegasus 34 to become a soft shoe, then you’ll be disappointed. The Pegasus 33 and 34 are firmer even by version 31 and 32 standards, and that’s as a result of the excess Zoom Air bag put into the forefoot this past year.

The only layer of perceivable softness is supplied by the removable insole and the foam lasting below it. The foam cavity beneath the heel also splays when loaded, and increases the cushioning experience.

Most runners would describe the Pegasus as a stiff shoe, and that’s not a long way away from the reality. The Zoom Air bags put in a high amount of responsiveness, however the trade-off is the lack of softness, especially at lower speeds. At an increased pace (faster than 5 min/km), the Zoom Air bags add a lot of springy feedback to the ride, whether or not you’re a forefoot or heel striker.

The firmness and relatively inflexible forefoot plays a part in the transition quality. Push-offs feel quick on the Pegasus 34 (and 33), a trait which increases the Pegasus 34’s versatile nature. The combo of standard foam and Zoom Air bags packs enough cushioning for gruelling marathons as the snappy feel makes the shoe well suited for shorter runs.

PROS AND CONS

The Pegasus is a decently priced, well-rounded package. The Pegasus undercuts almost all of its competitor by $10 and will be offering a ride character which combines a wholesome dose of cushioning with a good amount of springy responsiveness.

The upper includes a seamless interior and a secure fit, both which are positive traits on a running footwear. The durable outsole may be the icing on the cake.

All having said that, the Pegasus isn’t perfect. We’re yet to warm-up to the thought of the cord-based Flywire which puts localized pressure over the medial side. This happens way more on the Pegasus 34 which moves the cords nearer to the foot. Also, the 34’s heel reflectivity looks snazzier, but there’s less of it in comparison with the previous model.

The Pegasus 34 also appears (during writing this review) to have dropped the Extra-wide (4E) version that was previously on the 33. Why?

SUMMARY, AND CHANGES BETWEEN YOUR PEGASUS 34 AND PEGASUS 33
The ride quality hasn’t changed over this past year, so it’s ok if you opt to stick to the Pegasus 33. Both versions are equally versatile, more comfortable with dealing with long-distance runs up to shorter bursts. There’s satisfactory cushioning along the distance of the shoe blended with a snappy feel supplied by the Zoom Air bags.

All changes happen on the 34’s upper. Here’s a set of the updates: The laces differ from round to flat and the brand new engineered mesh upper is more breathable but slightly narrower. The Flywire cords are actually positioned nearer to the foot (hence the increased tightness), and there’s a decrease in heel reflectivity.