Once I had setup the Bose SoundTouch 300, I started hearing a few of my favourite movie soundtracks and the soundbar immediately impressed. Whatever the business has been doing within the 300 it evidently works, which is a great-sounding unit.

Naturally, a soundbar will be able to handle your regular TV viewing without the issues, therefore it proved with the SoundTouch 300. Whatever your preference, the sound was clear and well defined, with a pleasingly wide soundstage that spread over the front of the area because of the PhaseGuide technology.

Whether it was the news headlines, a documentary, a sporting event or a cookery show, the Bose could fire sound around either side of it, creating more width and a larger sense of immersion. Music and effects were delivered in an accurate fashion, while dialogue remained intelligible and centered on the screen.

Moving on to a thing that was more of a challenge, the brand new Amazon series Jack Ryan includes a very cinematic soundtrack that even includes Dolby Atmos encoding. The Bose neglects to take good thing about the latter, but nonetheless were able to impress with clear dialogue and expansive music. The consequences were positioned over the front of the area with a amount of precision, and the soundbar could go very loud without distorting or sounding strained.

The SoundTouch 300 handled the bass on Jack Ryan fairly well, but shifting to a soundtrack with a far more extended low-end like Ready Player One revealed the Bose’s strengths, but also its weaknesses. Dialogue remained clear and focused, and there is still a pleasant feeling of width and depth to music. That is a soundtrack with a lot of dynamic range, and the Bose had satisfactory grunt to provide that extra dynamism.

The consequences were also reproduced with a good amount of impact, however the overall soundstage lacked the sense of immersion you’ll get from an authentic 5.1 system. The Bose also struggled with the bass effects upon this film, of which there are various. Regardless of the inclusion of QuietPort bass extension, the SoundTouch 300 definitely lacked the low-end extension necessary for today’s Hollywood blockbusters. It could deliver enough bass for normal TV viewing and even TV dramas, but struggles in terms of movies.

Leaving TV and movies, the SoundTouch 300 proved very adept when it found two-channel audio. Actually, given the soundbar’s strengths, it sounded particularly good with music, rendering it a great all-rounder. The bigger registers were handled well, as the mid-range was solid and the bass better suitable for songs. That’s a positive thing taking into consideration the multiroom nature of the soundbar, and ensures that you can make make use of it to enjoy music in addition to Television shows and movies.

The width of the Bose allowed for excellent stereo separation, which led to better stereo imaging. The brand new Suede album The Blue Hour was delivered very well, with Brett Anderson’s vocals rendered in a clear and precise fashion, and the instruments located effectively over the soundstage. The bass performance was also far better, and the deep choral singing through the album’s opening track was handled nicely, as were the drums and bass.

The SoundTouch 300 can deliver a surprisingly wide and open soundstage, but there’s a major difference between adding some width and also replicating the result of rear speakers. The SoundTouch 300 hardly ever really created the impression there have been sounds emanating from the trunk, the music was always focused at the front end. The same was true of the bass presence, with the Bose really missing the support of a dedicated subwoofer.

The company does supply the possibility to expand the SoundTouch 300 right into a full 5.1 configuration. To get this done you’ll need to grab the Acoustimass 300 wireless subwoofer and the Virtually Invisible 300 wireless surround speakers. The combo of the accessories will let you create an authentic 5.1-channel system, nonetheless they add considerably to the price and the complete package would come to around £1,400. At that price, I’d definitely get the Samsung HW-N950 instead, using its 7.1.4 configuration and support for Dolby Atmos and D